Mohamed Salah scored his first goal of the Africa Cup of Nations.

Mohamed Salah scored his first goal of the Africa Cup of Nations as hosts Egypt secured a place in the last 16 on Wednesday with a 2-0 win over the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Ahmed Elmohamady prodded Egypt ahead on 25 minutes after a wicked Salah cross and the Liverpool star slammed in a second shortly before half-time to spark frenzied celebrations at a packed Cairo International Stadium.

Record seven-time champions Egypt rode their luck at times as DR Congo twice struck the crossbar in the first half but the Group A leaders held firm to join Nigeria as the first teams through to the knockout phase.

Egypt overcame the distraction of Amr Warda being banished from the squad earlier in the day over mounting sexual harassment allegations. The claims surfaced earlier this week on social media platforms. Multiple women posted screenshots and testimonies of Warda’s alleged lewd comments.

“I think the team is strong and the squad is strong but we are not happy to lose a member of our family,” said coach Javier Aguirre. “The team focused more on our match and played the 90 minutes in a serious manner. I don’t think the Egyptian team will be affected by the absence of anyone.”

Mexican Aguirre fielded the same side that defeated Zimbabwe 1-0, with centre-back Ahmed Hegazy sporting a mask after breaking his nose in the opening game of the tournament.

Salah was guilty of missing a hatful of chances in the curtain-raiser and this season’s Premier League joint top scorer again threatened inside five minutes here when an interception broke his way only for the Egyptian to skew wide under pressure.

 

After four days of small crowds, another capacity 75,000 crowd turned out to cheer on the hosts in the capital, but they were nearly silenced when Marcel Tisserand slammed against the bar at a corner.

  • Salah takes over –

DR Congo came to Egypt as one of the most unpredictable qualifiers having finished third in 2015 only to make a timid quarter-final exit two years ago, and they fell behind for the second straight game as Elmohamady forced home after the ball fell kindly to him following an aerial challenge with Christian Luyindama.

Having created the opener with his vicious right-wing cross, Salah then stung the palms of Ley Matampi with a powerful 25-yard free-kick.

Egypt would be rescued by the woodwork once more though when a deep cross was nodded back across goal by Bokadi Bope and Jonathan Bolingi’s looping header bounced back off the bar.

With his side riding their luck, Salah rose to the occasion and settled Egyptian nerves two minutes before half-time with a typically brilliant finish.

Played into space down the right by Mahmoud ‘Trezeguet’ Hassan, Salah skipped inside Tisserand and ripped a crisp low drive inside Matampi’s near post to cue a volcanic eruption from the masses of delirious Egyptian supporters.

Mohamed El Shenawy produced an excellent sprawling second-half save to claw out a Jacques Maghoma header, but despite an improvement on a horror first outing, DR Congo now know they must beat Zimbabwe in their final game in order to possibly advance as one of the four best third-place finishers.

“The feelings are mixed when you play such a match. Unfortunately we lost so the feeling is one of hurt, particularly for my players. They gave a lot and fought hard but didn’t get the result,” said DR Congo coach Florent Ibenge, whose side fell 2-0 to Uganda in their opening match.

“We’ve got one match left against Zimbabwe and we can hope for third place. We’re going to fight until the end.”

 

CULLED FROM:

 

http://www.msn.com/en-xl/sport/football/salah-sends-egypt-into-cup-of-nations-last-16/ar-AADuOPJ?li=BBQbcGp&ocid=spartandhp

Advertisements

How Egypt recorded slim victory against Zimbabwe.

Hosts Egypt recorded a slim victory against Zimbabwe in the opening fixture of the African Cup of Nations, AFCON, which kicked off in the Egyptian capital Cairo on Friday.

The first half strike came on the 41st minute mark through Mahmoud Trezeguet after a series of attacking waves on the Zimbabweans.

 

The Zimbabweans had their goalie Edward Sibanda to thank for thwarting the initial Egyptian inroads even as the Brave Warriors also carved out moments of brilliance threatening the hosts during exchanges.
Mahmoud Trezeguet is so far the only player who has scored in the 2019 AFCON tournament. #KawowoUpdates #AFCON2019 #EGYZIM pic.twitter.com/3sfSbs1Duh

— Kawowo Sports (@kawowosports) June 21, 2019.

 

CULLED FROM:

 

http://www.msn.com/en-xl/africa/sport/afcon-2019-updates-egypt-win-opener-against-zimbabwe-1-0/ar-AADeECj?li=BBQbcGp&ocid=spartandhp

How Zimbabwe Prisons worsen?

The Chikurubi Maximum Security Prison in Harare is crumbling at the seams, assailed by overcrowding and a critical shortage of medicines, food and other basics as the economically-crippled country battles to care for its inmates.

Convicts and wardens alike bemoan packed cells where running water is erratic and shortages of food, clothes and bedding prevail.

Basic painkillers and antibiotics are impossible to come by, meaning prisoners risk dying from easily-treatable conditions.

“We don’t have drugs for… ailments like pneumonia and meningitis. We need a functioning X-ray machine. As of now, our machine is down and yet this is a basic tool required for diagnosis,” Blessing Dhoropa, a doctor at the prison hospital, said as lawmakers visited Chikurubi last week.

AFP correspondents saw prisoners wearing threadbare uniforms in the prison’s male and female sections.

Inside the cells, paint flaked off some walls and for bedding, prisoners had thin blankets on bare cement floors.

One complained the cells were infested with lice and other vermin.

 

Such conditions are common in Zimbabwe’s 46 prisons. They were built to collectively incarcerate 14,000 prisoners, but hold more than 20,000 today.

Chikurubi’s men’s section houses 2,508 inmates instead of the 1,360 it was designed for.

“Our population is much higher than we should hold,” conceded Senior Assistant Commissioner Alvord Gapare, who oversees jails in the Harare province.

Diet ‘not suitable’

Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights (ZLHR) has condemned such “deplorable” conditions which it said “exposes inmates to illnesses and psychological trauma.”

In 2013, the body said, more than 100 prisoners died of malnutrition-related illnesses.

At Chikurubi, donors provide life-saving anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs for inmates who need it.

“I am HIV positive. Drugs for HIV are available. But other medicines, antibiotics… even the painkiller paracetamol, are not there,” 18-year-old prisoner Chiedza Chiwashira told members of parliament’s child welfare and justice committee on a fact-finding mission.

Another inmate complained there was “no medicine for epilepsy.”

And according to Gapare, Chikurubi’s only ambulance “is down”.

At Chikurubi, prisoners grumble about the staple diet of maize porridge without salt or sugar for breakfast, followed by the same, served with boiled kale, cabbage or beans, for lunch and dinner.

“Our diet is not suitable for people with ailments like diabetes and hypertension,” an inmate of the female section told the official visitors.

‘Not supposed to be here’

Gapare conceded the prison food has little nutritional value.

“We have challenges preparing the food that’s suitable for our prisoners. We cannot follow the dietary scale that we should follow. We serve mostly beans and vegetables,” he said.

In a bid to decongest the country’s jails, President Emmerson Mnangagwa granted amnesty to at least 3,000 prisoners in March last year.

But overcrowding persists as Zimbabwe’s convicts, like the general population, suffer the consequences of a moribund economy that has been in ruins since hyperinflation peaked at 500 billion percent and wiped out savings under former president Robert Mugabe.

Zimbabwe is undergoing another bout of price rises and shortages of fuel and daily essentials. Inflation is at more than 75 percent, putting basic goods beyond the reach of many.

The government is struggling to provide relief for citizens, let alone the prison population.

And the harshness of daily life continues feeding Zimbabwe’s already over-full prisons as many turn to crime to survive.

“Most of the patients are not supposed to be here,” Chikurubi’s deputy director for health services and a consultant psychiatrist, Patrick Mhaka told the lawmakers.

“Some are said to have stolen a loaf of bread and they end up here.”

Lawmaker Daniel Molokela asked prisoners and officials to draw up a list of needs, which he said the government would examine.

 

CULLED FROM:

 

http://www.msn.com/en-xl/africa/zimbabwe/prisons-under-siege-as-zimbabwes-economic-woes-persist/ar-AAD3bv9?li=BBQbcGp&ocid=spartandhp

 

 

Why is Zimbabwe Cities running out of vacant lands?

BULAWAYO, Zimbabwe, June 3 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – After Thomas Gumede’s father died in April, the Zimbabwean bus driver could not afford an expensive funeral. So, he applied for a burial plot through the local municipality.
He never expected he would end up burying his father halfway across Bulawayo, a city in southwest Zimbabwe.

“There are no cemeteries near where I live,” said Gumede, 39, whose father’s burial plot is about 25km (15 miles) from his home.

“Imagine the transport costs,” he lamented. Each time he visits his father’s grave, he spends “at least $20 on petrol”.

As demand for housing continues to drive Bulawayo’s growth into surrounding rural areas, the city is struggling to find enough space to bury its dead, said Emmanuel Ndlovu, coordinator of the Bulawayo Progressive Residents’ Association.

World Bank figures show about one-third of Zimbabwe’s 16 million people live in urban areas, and that its urban population is growing around 2 percent annually.

“The truth is, the municipality has run out of land, as it cannot keep expanding and encroaching into rural districts,” said Ndlovu, whose organisation lobbies the local municipality on behalf of residents.

With cemeteries in and around the city full to capacity, local authorities are encouraging citizens to consider alternatives to traditional burial.

But attempts to promote cremation, double burials or even recycled graves are coming up against long-held cultural and spiritual beliefs.

‘UNAFRICAN’

When Gumede was asked if cremation could be an option for his family, he rejected the idea outright by invoking “ubuntu,” the southern African philosophy that says a person is who they are because of their connectedness to all of humanity.

“We did not even consider (cremation) as a family. It’s unheard of in our ubuntu as Africans,” he said.

 

Early this year, the Bulawayo City Council (BCC) held public meetings to try to convince residents of the benefits of cremation, but the idea was roundly rejected as “unAfrican”, said Ndlovu.

According to BCC spokeswoman Nesisa Mpofu, the city of about 1.5 million people has had fewer than 30 cremations since the start of the year.

Searching for other solutions, the local government has started suggesting people bury two family members in the same plot, Mpofu told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in emailed comments.

But, like cremation, the idea has met resistance among residents.

“I have never heard of any such thing as a double burial,” said Lloyd Tshuma, a secondary school teacher.

Tshuma planned to avoid the stress of finding a cemetery space in the city by being buried in his family’s traditional plot in the countryside.

“I will be buried in my rural (area), as has my whole family,” he said.

TWO NEW CEMETERIES

Bulawayo municipality has also considered reusing old graves, a practice that is becoming more common in many parts of the world, as a growing number of countries find themselves low on space to bury the dead.

But Gibson Banda, a member of the Bulawayo United Residents’ Association, another organisation representing residents’ rights in the city, said families are not ready to bury loved ones in other people’s graves.

“There is a problem there because we believe people’s spirits linger in their graves,” Banda said.

“Imagine, then, your relative being buried among unknown spirits.”

BCC spokeswoman Mpofu noted that there are two new cemeteries planned for the city, but construction for both has been delayed.

But, once the two new cemeteries are finished “projections are that these will be enough burial space for all in the foreseeable future,” Mpofu said.

A CRISIS OF SPACE

Bulawayo’s efforts to make space for the dead mirrors its struggles to find affordable housing for the living.

According to Mpofu, the city has a housing waiting list of about 115,000 applicants and a target to provide homes for 3,000 people every year.

But as people continue to migrate into cities from rural areas, meeting housing targets has proven difficult across the country.

According to the finance ministry’s 2019 Infrastructure Investment Plan, the country has a backlog of more than one million who need housing.

About 400 kilometres north of Bulawayo, the capital Harare is also expanding at a rate faster than the municipality can cope with, according to city officials.

In April, minister of state Oliver Chidawu told state media that land shortages in the city were largely due to what he called “weak” government institutions that had allowed developers to buy up council-owned land, including plots that had been earmarked for cemeteries.

The Harare municipality office did not reply to several requests for comment.

In Bulawayo, council officials are stressing the urgency of finding enough cemetery space.

At a city council meeting in March, councillor Mlandu Ncube warned that the city needs “more graves than houses”.

The city’s ongoing shortage of burial sites has Gumede worried about the choices his family will face when he dies.

As he mourned his father, he hoped to take comfort in the idea that he could be near him again in death. Now, he fears that chance has gone.

“By the time I die, I have no idea where I would be buried,” he said.

CULLED FROM:

http://www.msn.com/en-xl/africa/zimbabwe/grave-problem-no-space-for-the-dead-in-zimbabwes-growing-cities/ar-AACjgEw?li=BBQbcGp&ocid=spartandhp

 

Why did Grace Mugabe attacked Model Gabriel Engels with an electrical extension in Johannesburg?

Zimbabwe’s former First Lady Grace Mugabe faces a second allegation of assault after she was accused of beating an employee at the family’s Harare mansion.
Mrs Mugabe, 53, is said to have become enraged that her 95-year-old husband gave the housekeeper a cash wedding gift, punching and striking the woman about the face with a shoe until blood gushed from her wounds.
Mrs Mugabe, sometimes known as “Gucci Grace”, is already wanted in South Africa on separate charges of attacking a model who had been drinking with her sons in Johannesburg.
Shupikai Chiroodza was formally employed by the government at State House, Mr Mugabe’s 10,000 square meter official residence which he built 15 years ago but chose not to live in.
However, the newlywed maid was seconded to the Mugabes’ private residence and claims she was assaulted there on 13 March.
“She started shouting at me and seized me by the neck and pulled me inside the house and locked the door,” Mrs Chiroodza said in her court application
“She started beating me with clenched fists shouting, ‘who do you think you are here, you are milking my husband behind my back.’
“She removed her shoes and continued assaulting me with them and blood started gushing out of my forehead, mouth and nose.”
She told her lawyer, Doug Coltart, that Mrs Mugabe told her to return the cash wedding present and not to tell anyone about the events of that day.
The former housekeeper, who has a newborn child and whose husband is unemployed, said she had never been fired and wanted her job and benefits but had failed to persuade Mr Mugabe’s administration to reinstate her.
She was also rebuffed, she claims, by senior civil servants employed by President Emmerson Mnangagwa who came to power via a coup d’etat later in 2017.
“She tried all the avenues she could to get her job back. It is unusual as a labour case as we have argued she was never fired. She was just told not to come back to work,” Mr Coltart said.
He said the matter was being handled by the civil division of the Attorney-General’s office.

 

Mrs Mugabe allegedly attacked model Gabrielle Engels with an electrical extension chord in a Johannesburg hotel nearly five months after her clash with her housekeeper.
Mr Mugabe is still in Singapore receiving medical treatment, according to members of the family in Harare. Mrs Mugabe recently returned to Zimbabwe.

 

Culled from:

http://www.msn.com/en-xl/africa/zimbabwe/grace-mugabe-accused-of-beating-housekeeper-with-shoe-until-blood-gushed-from-her-face/ar-AABlqFL?ocid=spartanntp